Amy Richards

Affiliate Professor and Chair of Philosophy

arichar1@eastern.edu

Amy Gilbert Richards, PhD is Affiliate Professor and Chair of Philosophy at Eastern University. She is also a Faculty Fellow of the Templeton Honors College's Master of Arts in Classical Teaching program. Building on her previous work in philosophical and theological anthropology, she teaches a course in this program called ‘Difference and Human Dignity in the Great Tradition’, which is dedicated both to developing an understanding of what it is to be human through the lens of disability and difference, and to offering practical techniques for classical classroom approaches for students with special needs. Also of note, Dr. Richards and Classical Academic Press have begun a collaboration project on a book related to her work in this course—more coming soon! She lives in Havertown, PA with her husband and their three small girls.

Education
  • Ph.D., University of Virginia: Philosophy
  • M.A., University of Virginia: Philosophy
  • B.A., Eastern University: Biochemistry and Philosophy, Templeton Honors College
Templeton Courses

HON 102  Justice and the Common Good (3 credits)
In this class we engage questions about justice and the common good by examining major texts and thinkers from the classical, Christian, modern, and contemporary perspectives. Particular attention will be given to the validity and purpose of law, differing conceptions of justice and their practical consequences for regime type, the grounds of human dignity and integrity, as well as selected problems of meta-ethics. (GE indicator addressed: Knowledgeable in Doing Justice)

HON 480  Honors Capstone (2 credits)
The Honors College core curriculum has been designed to nurture in students the cultivation of a rich, integrative, and coherent worldview—a worldview devoid of the common artificial divisions between academic pursuits, spiritual formation, cultural appreciation, and community life. The Honors Capstone is designed to revisit and, in some cases, recover the richness and coherence of an integrative humanistic, Christian worldview. Of particular importance for fourth-year students preparing for graduation, the course is posed as an opportunity for reflection and preparation for their vocational future. (GE indicator addressed: Formed in Christian Thought)